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Posts published in “Tutorial”

Tutorial: Advanced stimulus timing features

In the first tutorial about stimulus timing, we covered the primary way you can control the timing of your stimuli: by modifying the barrier property of each stimulus. But some timing scenarios are best controlled using other methods besides the barrier property, especially when you’re dealing with certain types of static stimuli (like text stimuli). This tutorial will cover a few additional ways…

Tutorial: Participant Grouping

Are you trying to assign some participants in your experiment to a control condition while other participants experience an experimental manipulation? Or, do you want to counterbalance the presentation of study elements across different participants to take care of potential order effects in your study? FindingFive can easily handle these situations with participant grouping. Participant grouping allows you to create…

Tutorial: Adjusting the timing of stimuli with barriers

This is the first in a series of three tutorials that will cover how to adjust timing of stimuli, responses, and trials in your FindingFive study. Many studies rely on components that must run for a certain amount of time before another study element occurs. For example, you might have a trial where an audio clip should play through completely…

Tutorial: Recording participant responses

FindingFive allows you to record a number of different types of participant responses. This blog post will cover the basics of how to collect your data using choice responses, ratings, free-text responses, and audio responses, along with a few ways to customize various types of responses. Soliciting choice responses A common response to solicit from participants is a choice among…

Crash Course Part 2: Running Your Study

FindingFive allows you to quickly and easily design experiments for deployment on the web. In this crash course, we will take a detailed tour through some of FindingFive’s features by designing a simple memory study: a modification of Tulving (1975). We highly recommend you follow through this example carefully before creating your own experiment. To see a working demo of…

Crash Course Part 1: Building Your Study

FindingFive allows you to quickly and easily design experiments for deployment on the web. In this crash course, we will take a detailed tour through some of FindingFive’s features by designing a simple memory study: a modification of Tulving (1975). We highly recommend you follow through this example carefully before creating your own experiment. To see a working demo of…