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FindingFive Community Update

An Interview with FindingFive’s Noah Nelson from Research Support on Our Recent Workshop

You recently gave a workshop at the University of Arizona on FindingFive. How would you describe the purpose of the workshop and the types of activities that workshop participants engaged in? The FindingFive workshop at the U of A was conceived of in order to encourage people to give FindingFive a try. By presenting a hands-on workshop guided by a…

Launching a study on Mechanical Turk

FindingFive works seamlessly with Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. FindingFive offers an easier way to program your study and simultaneously take advantage of the participant pool and easy payment procedure that Mechanical Turk offers. We’ve done all the nitty-gritty backend work for you, so you can launch your FindingFive experiment on MTurk by following these easy steps. Make sure you have an…

Coming November 4th: A Newer and Better FindingFive!

We are very excited to announce that our bundle release of new features will be live starting Monday, November 4th! In this blog post, we preview the following highlighted changes: Disclaimer: the screenshots and the features described in this post are not final. The final release may include products that are slightly different (and hopefully better) than what’s presented here.…

Premium Features are Launching Soon!

Over the past two years we have enjoyed substantial user growth. A big thank you to all the researchers who have found us so far! Now, we find ourselves needing to expand on our unique services so that we can increase our server resources to better serve the needs of this growing community of researchers. To do this, we are…

Tutorial: Yoked trials

There are lots of situations where you’ll want to randomize the order of your trials so that you can avoid potential order-of-presentation effects. This can easily be accomplished by setting the order property of your block to random. But in blocks where you have multiple trial templates, it might be important to keep the trials across templates paired together, even…

You shall not pass (yet): Iteratively training participants with conditional branching on FindingFive

A typical learning experiment is usually split into two phases: a training phase, where participants get to familiarize themselves with the learning task, and a test phase, where the performance of participants is evaluated. In these situations, researchers usually want to know which participants are the learners – those who successfully “get” the learning task during the training phase, and…

Speeding up a study block by block

Most of the studies run on the FindingFive platform are meant to be completed in a relatively short amount of time. In fact, an average study created on FindingFive contains 190 trials, which will take an average participant about 30 minutes to finish (assuming 10-15 seconds per trial). Our platform have been able to handle studies of such sizes pretty…

Researcher Interview with Lila Abreu – Princeton graduating senior studying race and romantic attractions through web-based survey studies

The core mission of FindingFive is to make the life of behavioral researchers just a little bit easier when it comes to conducting online studies. We are curious about how much success we have achieved, and how much work there is left to do. To that end, we asked a few researcher users of FindingFive for their thoughts on the…

Tutorial: Adjusting the timing of trials

In the first and second tutorials on how to adjust the timing of elements in your study, we covered how to control the timing of stimuli and responses within a trial. This post will show you how to control the timing of the trials within your study. Adjusting the time between trials (a.k.a., intertrial intervals) Creating trials that proceed automatically Using trial…

Tutorial: Advanced stimulus timing features

In the first tutorial about stimulus timing, we covered the primary way you can control the timing of your stimuli: by modifying the barrier property of each stimulus. But some timing scenarios are best controlled using other methods besides the barrier property, especially when you’re dealing with certain types of static stimuli (like text stimuli). This tutorial will cover a few additional ways…