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FindingFive Community Update

Tutorial: Participant Grouping

Are you trying to assign some participants in your experiment to a control condition while other participants experience an experimental manipulation? Or, do you want to counterbalance the presentation of study elements across different participants to take care of potential order effects in your study? FindingFive can easily handle these situations with participant grouping. Participant grouping allows you to create…

Researcher Interview with Dr. Sarah Bibyk

The core mission of FindingFive is to make the life of behavioral researchers just a little bit easier when it comes to conducting online studies. We are curious about how much success we have achieved, and how much work there is left to do. To that end, we asked a few researcher users of FindingFive for their thoughts on the…

Rapidly Prototyping a Study on FindingFive: How long does it take?

FindingFive aims to help researchers quickly prototype a study, but how quickly can one actually create a study on FindingFive? In this post, we’ll try to give an empirical answer to this question. Method We decided to look at one particular measure: the number of days between the moment a new study came into existence and the moment the study…

Tutorial: Adjusting the timing of stimuli with barriers

This is the first in a series of three tutorials that will cover how to adjust timing of stimuli, responses, and trials in your FindingFive study. Many studies rely on components that must run for a certain amount of time before another study element occurs. For example, you might have a trial where an audio clip should play through completely…

Researcher Interview: Shannon Grippando

The core mission of FindingFive is to make the life of behavioral researchers just a little bit easier when it comes to conducting online studies. We are curious about how much success we have achieved, and how much work there is left to do. To that end, we asked a few researcher users of FindingFive for their thoughts on the…

Tutorial: Recording participant responses

FindingFive allows you to record a number of different types of participant responses. This blog post will cover the basics of how to collect your data using choice responses, ratings, free-text responses, and audio responses, along with a few ways to customize various types of responses. Soliciting choice responses A common response to solicit from participants is a choice among…

Crash Course Part 2: Running Your Study

FindingFive allows you to quickly and easily design experiments for deployment on the web. In this crash course, we will take a detailed tour through some of FindingFive’s features by designing a simple memory study: a modification of Tulving (1975). We highly recommend you follow through this example carefully before creating your own experiment. To see a working demo of…

Crash Course Part 1: Building Your Study

FindingFive allows you to quickly and easily design experiments for deployment on the web. In this crash course, we will take a detailed tour through some of FindingFive’s features by designing a simple memory study: a modification of Tulving (1975). We highly recommend you follow through this example carefully before creating your own experiment. To see a working demo of…

Researcher Interview: Dr. Sara Finley

The core mission of FindingFive is to make the life of behavioral researchers just a little bit easier when it comes to conducting online studies. We are curious about how much success we have achieved, and how much work there is left to do. To that end, we asked a few researcher users of FindingFive for their thoughts on the…

The mystery of extra MTurk workers

For researchers who run their FindingFive studies on the Mechanical Turk platform, you may have occasionally got more subjects than requested. For example, the researcher may have requested 10 participants, but at the end of a session, FindingFive reports 11 completed your study, and Amazon only has a record of 10 workers who completed your HIT. There’s one extra mechanical…